Matthew 13:19

Very long and quite complex genitive absolute here:

Mat 13:19
19 παντος ακουοντος τον λογον της βασιλειας και μη συνιεντος ερχεται ο πονηρος και αρπαζει το εσπαρμενον εν τη καρδια αυτου, ουτος εστιν ο παρα την οδον σπαρεις.
(NA28)

Mat 13:19
19 When anyone hears the word about the kingdom and does not understand it, the evil one a comes and snatches what was sown in his heart; b this is the seed sown along the path.
(NET)

Adj – pcpl – art + dir obj – art + gen modifier – conj – negated pcpl

Whole clause is built around the genitive particle and is independent of the main clause (which is shown underlined).

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Luke 1v57

Sometimes it is fun(!?) and useful to practice disecting a verse and making sure you know what all the individual parts are doing, by writing down everything you possibly can. He’s my attempt for Luke 1:57:

Τῇ δὲ Ἐλισάβετ ἐπλήσθη ὁ χρόνος τοῦ τεκεῖν αὐτὴν καὶ ἐγέννησεν υἱόν

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Jude 1:1

I found a very long complex dative clause this morning.

“to the called ones” is the basic clause, but the noun is separated from its article by 8 words: 2 adjectival participial clauses each with its own subject, one expressed as a prepositional clause, the other as dative.

Literally:
To
    In God the father
  Loved ones
  And
    to/by Jesus Christ
  The kept ones
The called ones.

More smoothly:
To the called, loved in God the Father and kept to/by Jesus Christ.

Whether the dative clause is dative of interest (for Jesus) or means (by Jesus) is debatable.

Participles and Translation Practice

Now we have almost enough Aramaic under our belt to be able to do some translation. Using Reymond’s examples we’ll start with some simple English to Aramaic sentences.

Sometimes translating from English to Greek/Hebrew/Aramaic can seem a little pointless, since our primary goal is to be able to read those languages and translate into English. However, as we’ll see now, doing English to x really helps us grasp how the language works. So without further a do…

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